Plot

Before he was convicted of murdering a policeman in 1981 and sentenced to Death Row, Mumia Abu-Jamal was a gifted journalist and brilliant writer. Now after more than 30 years in prison and despite attempts to silence him, Mumia is not only still alive but continuing to report, educate, provoke and inspire. Stephen Vittoria’s new feature documentary is an inspiring portrait of a man whom many consider America’s most famous political prisoner. [First Run Features]

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Movie Reviews:
  • 50
    Variety - by Ronnie Scheib
    Stephen Vittoria's documentary about Mumia Abu-Jamal -- unrepentant commie cop-killer to some, political martyr to others -- makes no bones about its allegiance. ...

  • 40
    Los Angeles Times - by
    Mumia Abu-Jamal would be the perfect subject for an investigative documentary that explored his life and thought with a calm and even hand. Mumia: Long Distance Revolutionary is not that film. ...

  • 38
    Slant Magazine - by Kenji Fujishima
    Purports to tell the true story of the titular imprisoned, controversially outspoken death-penalty opponent, but eventually degenerates into an orgy of congratulation. ...

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User Comments & Reviews

  1. Liana Shimunova

    Everyone in West Philadelphia knows that Mumia did not kill officer Faulkner. We know who did it, and we know that that never mattered to the police and prosecutors who were determined to silence Mumia for his scathing criticisms of governmental racism, police brutality and social oppression. Rather than retrying the legal case, flawed as it was, this movie is the story of a successful radio journalist, imprisoned for 30 years, whose passion has always been to expose social injustices. Through interviews and public records, this movie traces his journalistic career from the age of 15 until the present day. For many this will be the first time Mumia’s voice has ever been heard. His story is eloquently illustrated through disturbing film clips, first-hand testimonials, and his own voice. The real question here is this: Will you watch the move and make up your own mind, or have you already swallowed the story that has been perpetuated by the hate-mongers of talk radio and the mindless followers of corrupt organizations?