Plot

A solipsistic filmmaker takes his independent film on tour. Hoping to escape the pain of his recent breakup, he stumbles into a twisting constellation of fear, sex, and tortured illumination. A tragicomedy about death and marriage, RED FLAG unfurls across six sates, four broken souls, and one very elusive bird.

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Film information

Genre: ,
 
Director:
 
Starring: , , , , , , , , ,
 
Release date: Feb 22, 2013
 
Official website: http://www.redflagfilm.com/
 
Runtime: 85 min
 
Movie Reviews:
  • 80
    NPR - by Ian Buckwalter
    A hilarious meta-comedy in which Karpovsky, playing a version of himself, goes on a roadshow tour for a movie he's directed. ...read more

  • 75
    The A.V. Club - by Scott Tobias
    Modest, personal, and nicely proportioned, Red Flag resembles one of Hong Sang-soo’s self-reflexive doodles about relationships and filmmaking — "Oki’s Movie," in particular — and it wisely doesn’t take too big a bite. ...

  • 75
    Entertainment Weekly - by Owen Gleiberman
    It's conventional stuff, only executed with a smart, improv-y verve. ...read more

  • 50
    Slant Magazine - by Nick McCarthy
    It surprisingly abandons its obvious meta elements and unfolds as a straightforward road-trip flick, opting for an exhibition of self-loathing rather than self-reflexivity. ...read more

  • 40
    Variety - by Peter Debruge
    There's a reason creepy character actors seldom play lead, and Karpovsky's amusingly off-kilter quality is better suited to the background, while Prediger (as the stranger he desperately wants to ditch, lest his ex-g.f. discover his infidelity) has the makings of an indie star. ...

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User Comments & Reviews

  1. Liana Shimunova

    This could be a recipe for excessive self-indulgence, but the meta quality of “Red Flag” is entirely irrelevant to its low key charm and persistent irreverence — anchored, as always, by Karpovsky’s loopy screen presence.