Plot

Paul Harris works at a small research facility on the outskirts of Boston. After a weekend tryst with a co-worker leaves him wanting more, his unreciprocated desires gradually mold into an acute infatuation. When Danielle takes interest in a new scientist at the laboratory, Paul’s suppressed resentments and perverse delusions finally become unhinged, triggering a horrific course of events that mercilessly engulf a tortured past and fugitive present.

Rating

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Acting
 
 
 
 
 


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Movie Reviews:
  • 80
    The Hollywood Reporter - by John DeFore
    A character-driven take on true-crime fare, Alex Karpovsky's Rubberneck marks a solid dramatic turn for a filmmaker best known for playing comedic parts in indie films like "Tiny Furniture." ...read more

  • 75
    Entertainment Weekly - by Owen Gleiberman
    The movie is scattershot (intense at some moments, slack at others), but it earns its docu-style creepiness, and Karpovsky's stretch as an actor is daring and authentic. ...read more

  • 70
    Salon.com - by Andrew O'Hehir
    Rubberneck immediately put me in mind of the classic slow burn of vintage thrillers like Fritz Lang’s “M” and Michael Powell’s “Peeping Tom,” although Karpovsky and co-writer Garth Donovan have cited all kinds of other things, from “Michael Clayton” to “Caché” to “Fatal Attraction.” ...read more

  • 70
    Variety - by Ronnie Scheib
    Unlike Steven Soderbergh's twisty "Side Effects," Karpovsky's picture seldom surprises, its strengths lying in a leisurely journey toward a clearly predestined denouement. ...

  • 63
    Boston Globe - by Ty Burr
    What’s good about Rubberneck is also what makes it tough to watch: Karpovsky burrows under the skin of this repressed romantic nebbish until the frame seems ready to burst. ...read more

  • 55
    NPR - by Ian Buckwalter
    The thriller elements of the plot — which Karpovsky delivers quite ably, with an electric tension that carries through much of the film — aren't really balanced by the personal revelations on which Karpovsky eventually hangs Paul's problems. Both the mystery and the character piece wind up feeling incomplete. ...read more

  • 50
    The Playlist - by Drew Taylor
    Rubberneck is a thriller too drab and self-obsessed to ever be truly thrilling. ...read more

  • 50
    The A.V. Club - by Scott Tobias
    The entire story hinges on a thinly calibrated twist ending that’s meant to provide emotional weight to Karpovsky’s actions, but instead clarifies them to the point of utter banality. There’s no mystery left to linger. ...read more

  • 40
    New York Daily News - by Joe Neumaier
    The film works better as an uncomfortable character drama than as a murky family mystery, which Karpovsky deepens with some psychobabble. Still, a nicely sinister and shuddersome effort. ...read more

  • 30
    The New York Times - by Rachel Saltz
    It’s dragged down by non-scene after non-scene, and filmmaking choices that don’t earn their keep. ...

Movie images
User Comments & Reviews

  1. Luctian

    Slow going and doesn’t live up to the description. Ok for a one time watch but you’re better off finding something else to watch.




  2. matsite

    Boring as hell, don’t waste your time 1/5




  3. g8tkeeper2

    yep, very boring.