Plot

A high school boy desperate to escape the idiocy of the people in his hometown trys to create a way in which he can move to New York, attend the college of his dreams and do something other than live in the foot steps of his drunken, divorced mother. Along the way he blackmails his fellow students into contributing to his literary magazine and discovers what its like to feel accomplished. Does he get accepted into the college of his dreams? Is he going to make a difference and follow his life goal?

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Film information

Genre: ,
 
Director:
 
Starring: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
 
Studio:
 
Release date: Jan 11, 2013
 
Official website: http://www.struckbylightning-movie.com
 
Runtime: 90 min
 
Movie Reviews:
  • 50
    New York Post - by Sara Stewart
    There's also a refreshing lack of wrapping everything up in a neat, happy bow at the end. ...

  • 50
    Los Angeles Times - by Mark Olsen
    Genial and heartfelt but essentially toothless, lacking in either snark or spark. ...

  • 50
    Rolling Stone - by Peter Travers
    In his screenwriting debut, Glee's gifted Chris Colfer, 22, proves he can lace a line with sass and soul. The downside of Struck by Lightning, besides the fact that Colfer's character, Carson Phillips, is struck dead in the first scene, is that Colfer hands himself all the best lines. ...read more

  • 40
    New York Daily News - by Elizabeth Weitzman
    One can't blame Colfer for wanting to expand his range, but he's created a character who is neither hero nor villain, in a black comedy that is neither dark nor funny enough. ...read more

  • 20
    Time Out New York - by David Fear
    Then observe as all but the hard-core Colferphiles slink out embarrassed, feeling as confused and discombobulated as if they too just took an electric bolt to the brain. ...read more

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User Comments & Reviews

  1. Liana Shimunova

    One can’t blame Colfer for wanting to expand his range, but he’s created a character who is neither hero nor villain, in a black comedy that is neither dark nor funny enough